Woodturnings

Wood working that I find interesting. Mostly woodturning and specifically wood bowls and vessels. You will see a lot of my work too.

midcenturymodernfreak:

1950s Arthur Umanoff Serving Cart RaymorWrought iron frame, sisal-rope/rattan, and four sliding doors lacquered in caramel or aqua and white inside. - Via

penfancy:

#lignumvitea #applecore #shaving #shavingbrushhandle #wetshave #woodturning #lathe #handmade #jameswaterscreations

penfancy:

#lignumvitea #applecore #shaving #shavingbrushhandle #wetshave #woodturning #lathe #handmade #jameswaterscreations

leahamywadey:

Central Lathe workshop today ☺️ #lathe #workshop #wood #chemiwood #handmade #art #uni #jewellery #contemporaryjewellery

leahamywadey:

Central Lathe workshop today ☺️
#lathe #workshop #wood #chemiwood #handmade #art #uni #jewellery #contemporaryjewellery

paulcanbuildthat:

Updated Mallet

Here are some additional pictures of the mallet I turned in my woodworking class.  After my previous post on the mallet, we spent some additional time finishing the turning.  Primarily, it consisted of smoothing the surfaces and then sanding them.

As part of the smoothing process on mine, my TA suggested that I didn’t want to keep the top rounded as I originally turned it since it wouldn’t stand on the top and, being round, would roll off the bench.  (Thanks Steve!).  As you can see in the second pic, I might have gone a bit overboard on the flattening :)

It was suggested that we soak our finished mallets in linseed oil for 24 hours, so I bought some oil at H-D and then looked around for a suitable container to hold the oil and mallet.  Unfortunately, I couldn’t find a container thin enough that the oil would cover the entire mallet.

Laura is out of town and doesn’t know that I used one of her pitchers…  Shhhh! Don’t tell her!

After filling the picture with the oil, the mallet floated up a bit, so I added the can to the top to hold it down.  As you can see, it’s only about half-way submerged, but I think that’s fine.  I’ll be interested to see if the fibers soak the oil up into the handle.  If not, I’ll probably just flip it over and let it soak for another 24 hours.

I’ll post a final picture after it comes out of the oil.

I’m looking forward to being able to use this with my chisels instead of the dead-blow hammer I’ve been using…


PaulCanBuildThat can be followed on Tumblr, on Twitter, on Pinterest, and on Google+.

noodleverse:

Some plywood turned bowls I made yesterday. Sealed with butcher block. The one on the left is poplar plywood and the right is common plywood.

noodleverse:

Some plywood turned bowls I made yesterday. Sealed with butcher block. The one on the left is poplar plywood and the right is common plywood.